Milan Expo 2015: Timber structure revealed for Azerbaijan Pavilion

Event design group Simmetrico Network teamed up with Milan-based architecture studio Arassociati and landscape architects AG&P to develop Azerbaijan’s pavilion for the World Expo in Milan next year.

After the completion of the Expo, the pavilion will be completely dismantled and relocated to country’s capital, Baku.

Featuring wavy timber louvers, the pavilion uses ecologically responsible architecture principles as part of the Expo theme, Feeding the Planet, Energy for Life.

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Built from natural and recyclable materials, the designers said the pavilion will use fast sustainable methods for its construction using wood and iron, enclosed in a glass and steel envelope. The slatted wooden shell will provide additional protective and decorative layering.

In order to reduce air conditioning requirements and maintaining transparency the architects used undulating timber louvers that will shield the interiors from direct sunlight while simultaneously making use of natural lighting for the indoor spaces.

Another key part of the pavilion is the two glazed spheres, as well as an additional one made from curving metal strips which will intersect the floors of the four storey building at different levels.

Poking through a slatted wooden roof will be one of the metal glass structures while the other will stick out from the building’s open end.

The spheres purpose will be accommodate facilities for welcoming visitors and introducing them to different parts of Azerbaijan’s resources including climate, geography and diversity.

“The biosphere was chosen as the iconic symbol of the Pavilion, the best metaphor to represent Azerbaijan as a country that protects the growth and the qualitative development of the environment and its natural, human and cultural resources,” the architects told design and architecture blog, Dezeen.

The pavilion will celebrate Azerbaijan’s countryside, technology and agriculture as well as display the country’s culinary traditions and culture.

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