5 minutes with… Chiara Moreschi

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Chiara Moreschi, graduated in industrial design at the Milan Politecnico Design school in 2005, and in 2008 she opened her own design studio. She also teaches a master course in product design at the Istituto Marangoni, Milan.

Among her designs are the Cipì doorstopper, made in plastic for Outlook Design Italia, Albisola ceramic mug for Mesa and the Twink, suspension lamp for P&V Lighting.

In 2009, she launched ‘Solitaire’ suspension lamp, an oversized ring in plastic and crystals for P&V Lighting, and she organised, together with four other designers, the Dismettiamola exhibition about the importance of proper waste disposal during Milan Design Week.

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“My desire to become an industrial designer slowly matured ever since I was a little girl and I used to help my dad, who built furniture and objects, in his small workshop at home in the garage. When I went on to high school I realised I could never work in a profession where I had to dress formally and bent down over paperwork. Then, I started university where I confidently pursued a career as a yacht designer, not before discovering I was more attracted to the world of objects,” said Moreschi.

She is one of seven designers, including Luca Nichetto and Alessandro Busana, who work for P&V Lighting in Italy, which creates floor, ceiling, suspension, table and wall lamps and sells its products through Alpha Crystal in the UAE.

The company has been in the market for more then 30 years.

“The projects I work on have very different stories, but a feature that unites them all is that they take their shape from a sort of continuous pre-project activity, which allows me to gather a series of information and signals which I then apply to the specific concept of the product,” she said.

“I collect and take note of intuitions which often seem to be disorderly or have no sense to me, but it is then the unique connection they have among each other which makes the project stand out. I find the ‘Ten Principles for Good Design’, by Dieter Rams offers the best advice for what a project should be.”

Moreschi says she is particularly fond of her Solitaire lamp which she designed for P&V Lighting because it has brought her a lot of luck.

“The name itself evokes the idea of the product from which it was generated. Its crystals, typically used by P&V Lighting in developing its products, turn into an even more precious detail: the body of the lamp becomes the setting that embraces the precious gems, just like a ring,” she said.

“The thick network of crystals hide the source of light, the light that pours outwards illuminates the crystals themselves and at the same time it is diffused and softened when reflected on the curved surface of the structure.

The most important part of this product is that the crystals are meant to be used in a more concentrated manner, which does not reduce its value, but valorises and exalts it by means of a matchless collocation.” The designer said it was necessary to have a constructive relationship with a client for the good outcome of a project.

“The designer’s and the principal company’s skills do not overlap but complete one another,” she said.

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