Bruno Stringheta discusses experiencing Dubai’s architectural fabric

According to Bruno Stringheta, a project architect at the regional design firm JT+Partners, architecture in Dubai still has room to develop, and should focus on the human experience in the coming years.

“The buildings here are nice pieces of sculpture, but there doesn’t seem to be much consideration for the experience of the enduser,” he says.

“They look very nice, and some public developments have great atmosphere, like City Walk and The Beach. But it’s like, if you’re directing a movie, you’ll know how the camera should move through the scenes and take the viewer from one setting to another – you don’t get that in the architecture here. There’s living in the city, but not experiencing it.”

The Brazilian architect, a native of Belo Horizonte – home to various projects by modernist icon Oscar Niemeyer – moved to the Middle East more than five years ago, when he boarded a plane to Qatar to work at Albaker Architects. A little over two years ago, he moved again to Dubai to join X Architects and later, JT+Partners. Before his residence in the GCC, Stringheta lived in Istanbul and Frankfurt.

“My personal interests always kept me moving and, along the way, I met my wife. We both wanted to travel and work in new places,” he says. Of staying in Dubai for the long run, it seems Stringheta is content, as he sees room to contribute something of his own to the urban landscape.

A bonus for the architect, working in Dubai brings in clients from many different countries, which keeps him learning about new cultures and applying his findings to his projects.

“Most designers know exactly how they’re going to design something when they’re working with a client – they’re in a box, really,” he says. “But at JT+Partners, we’re always trying to insert a key moment into our projects, like an entrance or a corridor. It’s always interesting if you can bring even just a small experience to a project.”

Since joining JT+Partners, Stringheta has worked on a number of projects that range from hospitality
retreats to residential condos. The company’s portfolio, includes luxury developments in countries like Sri Lanka, Morocco, India and Seychelles.

“Architecture in the GCC is fast,” he adds. “It’s always about experimentation against time. The time is there and you can do without the experimentation, but you’ll get a much nicer project with the latter.”

Recently, Joe Tabet, the managing director of JT+Partners, contributed to a conversation about the GCC hospitality market diversifying. Read about it here

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