Dubai Frame nears completion

Dubai Frame site visit,    { Dubai }, UAE}, {january } , {2016 } (Photo by {Rajesh Raghav}/ITP Images)   ;25-01-16 Dubai Frame site_CW

A new point to view the urban design which characterises Dubai is nearing completion.

The Dubai Frame will offer panoramic views of the city’s best-known architectural landmarks, both old and new as the 150m-high, 93m-wide structure has been designed to resemble a giant picture frame.

On one side stand historic locales such as Bastakiya, Bur Dubai, Karama, and Deira. And on the other visitors will see “New Dubai”, with modern masterpieces such as Burj Al Arab, Emirates Towers, and Burj Khalifa.

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The project’s developer, Dubai Municipality expects the Frame to attract more than two-million visitors per year following completion.

Al Rostamani Pegel (ARP) is acting as the main contractor for this ambitious development.

“It is quite an unusual structure, and in many ways, it’s more like building a bridge,” the company said

“We’ve been asked on numerous occasions by people if they can buy an apartment [at the project], because they saw these two cores going up and didn’t understand what it was about.”

The Frame consists of two 150m-tall cores, known as “legs”, which are linked by a bridge that will allow visitors to walk across the structure. Each leg features fire stairwells and panoramic lifts, which have been supplied by Thyssenkrupp.

The first two floors of the columns were constructed using conventional shutters; the remainder were built with a self-climbing formwork system, which covers three levels at a time. The formwork’s floor-to-floor height is 3.1m and the Frame boasts 46 floors in total, including its roof level.

ARP says that the Frame will also feature a porous mesh on the exterior.

“Wind shear-forces would have too much impact on the slender tower structure. So, to counter this, the building’s designers – in consideration of wind tunnel tests conducted in London – decided to make the sides of the towers porous, using a mesh instead of ordinary cladding,” said a spokesman.

“This allows wind to pass through the opening within the towers and dramatically reduce the forces involved.”

 

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