Dubai is home to three of the region’s nine skyscrapers built in 2017, says CTBUH

The Middle East saw the completion of nine 200m-plus buildings in 2017 with three built in Dubai, according to a report released by the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH).

The organisation’s annual web report, ‘2017 Another Record-Breaker for Skyscraper Completions; Most Geographically Diverse Year on Record’, showed that more buildings of 200m height or more were completed in 2017 than any other year, with a total of 144 completions.

Making up 6.3 percent of the global total, The Middle East’s tall building construction has dropped since 2016 by one building. The tallest this year was Marina 101 in Dubai, which holds the rank for the 18th tallest building in the world at 425m. Riyadh came second in the region with two recently completed skyscrapers.

“The data from 2017 shows a continuation of the trend towards a greater global proliferation of skyscraper construction,” said CTBUH Executive Director Antony Wood.

“High-rise construction is no longer confined to a select few financial and business centres, but rather is becoming the accepted global model for densification as more than one million people on our planet urbanise each week. 13 cities saw their first 200m-plus high-rise completion in 2017, in addition to the 28 cities and eight countries that saw their tallest building completed this year,” he added.

The report also stated that China has once again completed the majority of the 200m-plus buildings this past year, with 76 completions making up 53 percent of the global total. Another slight decrease from 2016, China is still by far the world leader in skyscraper construction — Shenzhen remains the city with the most 200m-plus building completions with 12 buildings finished in 2017.

Africa completed its second 200m-plus building, Britam Tower, located in Nairobi. The council expects to see more tall building completions across Africa in the coming years.

It is tempting to speculate that we are now seeing the built results of a full-blown recovery from the 2008 economic crisis, as greater confidence in single-function programs sparks a resurgence in speculative residential development,” said Steve Watts, CTBUH Chairman. “Further, there’s been growing interest over the past several years in residential real-estate investment by absentee owners as a wealth management strategy. However, market dynamics vary greatly between regions, so it’s likely there are other factors to the story.”

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