London supermarket and flats complex voted UK’s ugliest building

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 A supermarket complex in London has been awarded the Carbuncle Cup 2014 – an unwelcome accolade given to the UK’s ugliest new building.

 The prize is organised by the architecture website Building Design, and aims to pick out buildings that are “unforgivably bad and deserve to be named and shamed”.

 Its judges described Woolwich Central in south east London as “oppressive, defensive, arrogant and inept”.

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 The structure consists of a Tesco supermarket with apartments on top, all wrapped in striped metal cladding.

 Describing the 17-storey structure as “lumpen”, judges said it towered over its low-rise neighbours, and managed to make its immediate neighbour, Greenwich council’s town hall and former Carbuncle Cup nominee, a “pimple on the face of a morbidly obese bully.”

 The prize is organised by the architecture website Building Design, and aims to pick out buildings that are “unforgivably bad and deserve to be named and shamed”.

 “The building’s worst crime is it diminishes the efforts of those who have worked hard to regenerate this run-down, deprived part of London. Our judges had nothing good to say about the building,” the panel said.

 Greenwich Council’s former head of planning Alex Grant, who gave the scheme the green light in 2007, told the magazine: “It may not be a carbuncle but it is a flawed project and I regret my role as its midwife.“

 Sheppard Robson, the architecture firm behind the project, said it had aimed to create a “cohesive piece of strong architecture that this vast space and establish a desirable place to live.”

 Tesco made the shortlist with another development, Trinity Square shopping centre in Gateshead, in the north of England, which was built on the former site of a car park famous in the Michael Caine film “Get Carter”.

 The car park’s architect, Owen Luder, was also a Carbuncle Cup judge. He said: “The first principle of demolition should be to put up something that was better than was there before. Whatever you thought of the car park, this project is much worse.”

 A spokesman for Spenhill, Tesco’s development arm, said: “We worked and consulted with local communities at Woolwich and Trinity Square and both developments have had a positive effect. We’ve created more than 1,000 jobs and built much-needed homes in an area of London untouched by investment for many years.”

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