Naqsh Collective uses elements of traditional Palestinian embroidery as part of its exhibition in Amman

Amman-based design collective Naqsh has launched an exhibition in Jordan’s capital entitled, ‘The Thirst for Solidarity’, rooted in the cultural heritage of Palestine.

The founders of the Naqsh collective, sister duo Nisreen and Nermeen Abu Dail have curated a mixture of design works centred on traditional embroidery that has been reinterpreted through a contemporary aesthetic.

“Finding this graphical treasure and recreating it was an enjoyable challenge, yet it was a duty to bring back the delights of our culture and mould them in a modern context to showcase it to the world, specially our own,” said Nermeen Abu dail, designer and co-founder.

The exhibition follows a fictional story of a bride who hides a precious carpet woven in traditional embroidery patterns in her garden to protect its value. According to the story, years went by but the carpet remained in the garden, collecting dust and age, as the groom did not return from the war.

The pieces of embroidery that is exhibited metaphorically captures the hidden treasure of the garden, as remnants of a war-torn history and the pride of conserving tradition and culture.

All the designs exhibited are based on Palestinian embroidery patterns, using units such as: Zahret Toot (Blueberry flower), Asfoor Ala Ashajar (Bird on trees), Ere’ Oronfol (Carnation), Sarweh (Cypress tree), Woorood (Flowers), Nakhel Alai (Palm trees), Ejrein Jajeh (Chicken feet), and Rummanet Karmah (Karmah’s pomegranate).

Nisreen and Nermeen selected an array of  hard and “everlasting” materials  such as stone and brass to ensure the longevity of heritage.

The exhibition runs from 20th August until 20th September 2017, in Tiraz Widad Kawar, Home for Arab dress in Amman, Jordan.

Naqsh Collective was involved in the inaugural Amman Design Week last year, which brought together a diverse group of designers and architects from across the country and the wider Middle East.

designMENA spoke to various prominent bodies from the Middle East design scene, exploring how different initiatives have influenced the development of design across the region. 

 

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