Showcasing the treasures of Louvre Abu Dhabi

Louvre Abu Dhabi_Interior Image 3

Meyvaert Glass Engineering is to provide the display cases for artworks to be displayed at the Louvre Abu Dhabi.

The Belgian-based fit-out company, which specialises in engineering, producing and installing museum exhibiting spaces, will provide more than 100 cases which will house objects from the permanent collection.

These include rare and delicate pieces such as a 13th century Syrian section of the Holy Qur’an, containing suras 78 to 114 and an Egyptian mummy bandage from Ptolemaic period.

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The signing of the contract took place in an official ceremony attended by Princess Astrid of Belgium, TDIC board member Ali Alhaj Al Mehairbi, and senior representatives from both bodies

Ali Yousif Al Hammadi, CEO at TDIC, said: “This new milestone in the museum’s development reflects our commitment to not only focus on the construction of Louvre Abu Dhabi, but also to ensure that the museum’s interiors meet the highest of standards expected.

“We are pleased to announce that Meyvaert Glass Engineering will be supplying the display cases for Louvre Abu Dhabi’s art collection, given their international reputation of supplying high quality cases for reputable museums across the world.”

When in place the display cases will be position in the middle of the galleries and seem to rise up from the ground.

The cases and bell jars are generously sized, allowing visitors to discover the works from all points of view. Furthermore, museum’s design ensures the bases and podiums will blend into the galleries’ surroundings, as though they had taken root in the floor.

The company said the cases’ featured technology will be discreet and each will also be equipped with unobtrusive valves that will allow the future installation of devices to facilitate air circulation, depending on the artefact’s requirements, as well as invisible temperature and humidity detectors.

The cases will also feature state-of-the-art security measures linked to an internal central command centre.

Steven de Tollenaere, CEO at Meyvaert, said: “We are pleased to have been appointed to deliver the display cases for this unique museum, whose technical requirements are of a higher standard than the typical specifications requested.

“Since the company’s inception in 1826, our cases have been used to display artefacts all around the world, and so we are confident that we can rise to the project’s challenges, which include shipping our individually-designed cases in special temperature-controlled containers, to ensure they remain unscathed, before they are reassembled within the museum.”

Once completed, Louvre Abu Dhabi will encompass 9,200m2 of art galleries. The 6,681m2 Permanent Gallery will house the museum’s permanent collection taking the visitor through a universal journey from the most ancient to contemporary art works from different civilisations.

 

The Temporary Gallery will be a dedicated space of 2,364m2 presenting touring exhibitions of international standards. The gallery spaces will also include a children’s museum.

Dutchman Rem Koolhaas, 70, renowned for his work on the CCTV building in Beijing and the Prada building in New York, addressed a packed auditorium at the American University of Sharjah on Tuesday.

His speech drew a large crowd of students, faculty and members of the public.

“Dubai has escaped from its architectural caricatures,” Mr Koolhaas said.

“There’s a great evidence of sophistication and an emergence of local architects that recognise authenticity,” he said.

Mr Koolhaas had a positive outlook on the region despite recent upheaval and said that it provided the opportunity for the dawn of something new.

He also praised the involvement of the country’s rulers and the freedom they have given to designers to transform the landscape of the region.

Clement Vincent, a professor of design at the American University of Sharjah, said: “The lecture was informative. I admired how Koolhaas created open spaces and passages in his landmarks that the general public can enjoy without having the need to pay. His designs are inclusive, as we have seen in China and Taipei.”

An African safari experience, botanical gardens and an amphitheatre are to be built in Al Ain as part of a major development plan for the emirate.

World Desert Oasis will be constructed at the Zoo and Aquarium Public Institution of Al Ain, and includes an oasis garden, botanical garden, children’s discovery area and a safari, which hopes to showcase wildlife in its natural environment.

When completed, the project will have covered almost 11 million square metres. It is one of 76 projects approved last year by the Abu Dhabi Urban Planning Council, which hopes to boost tourism, industry and quality of life for residents across the emirate.

Other projects include 3.8 million square metres of residential and commercial development called Wahat Al Zaweya and 275 villas for Emiratis as part of the Al Ghaniema development.

A mixed-use waterfront development was announced for Mirfa City, which includes four retail and a residential complex with 126 apartments and 10 villas.

A master plan was approved for aerospace-based industrial development at Al Ain airport.

For Abu Dhabi city, a concept plan for Al Maryah Central was approved, hoping to make it a world-class shopping destination.

Maryah Plaza, a luxury development on Al Maryah Island, was approved and construction is expected to begin soon.

On Reem Island, Al Qurm View, a low-rise building overlooking the mangroves in Shams Abu Dhabi, was also approved.

An African safari experience, botanical gardens and an amphitheatre are to be built in Al Ain as part of a major development plan for the emirate.

World Desert Oasis will be constructed at the Zoo and Aquarium Public Institution of Al Ain, and includes an oasis garden, botanical garden, children’s discovery area and a safari, which hopes to showcase wildlife in its natural environment.

When completed, the project will have covered almost 11 million square metres. It is one of 76 projects approved last year by the Abu Dhabi Urban Planning Council, which hopes to boost tourism, industry and quality of life for residents across the emirate.

An African safari experience, botanical gardens and an amphitheatre are to be built in Al Ain as part of a major development plan for the emirate.

World Desert Oasis will be constructed at the Zoo and Aquarium Public Institution of Al Ain, and includes an oasis garden, botanical garden, children’s discovery area and a safari, which hopes to showcase wildlife in its natural environment.

When completed, the project will have covered almost 11 million square metres. It is one of 76 projects approved last year by the Abu Dhabi Urban Planning Council, which hopes to boost tourism, industry and quality of life for residents across the emirate.

 

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