On top of the world


UK: Inspired by the incredible views of London’s skyline, the new restaurant and bar, Oblix, hollers from the 32nd floor of the Shard.

The restaurant offers views to the north and west, overlooking the Thames River and St Paul’s Cathedral while the bar and lounge face the east and south, offering wonderful views of London’s Tower Bridge.

Founded by renowned chef, Rainer Becker, the face behind Zuma, Roka and the Shochu Lounge, the new endeavor strays from the chef’s usual Japanese cuisine and culture, offering a more up-scale urban dining destination.


Working closely with Italian architect and designer, Claudio Silverstrin, Oblix was transformed into a sophisticated space composed of upscale class.

The 920m2 eatery is divided into two zones: one being the formal dining area and the other a lounge and bar, united by a long stretching spine with a desk-less reception.

The lengthy tunnel is purposefully intended to appear cave-like with soft atmospheric lighting which leads one into a complete contrasting zone of modern scenery.

Silverstrin states that the motivation behind the interior design was to create a perfectly serene space where “the experience of dining becomes a unique journey: the feeling of being on top of the world, yet clearly grounded to it.”

The designer kept a neutral colour palette for the space in addition to the use of natural materials such as raw brown, yellow and red sandstone with porphyry flooring, walls and counters. Other materials include copper and bronze liquid metal, marmorino, tan leather upholstery and ebony wood.

“I wanted to provide the restaurant with a distinguished image of solidity, permanence and timeless luxury,” said Silverstrin.

The natural materials and colour scheme of Oblix juxtaposes with its metropolis surroundings, taking in pieces of both worlds. The overall natural setting is intensified by shiny stone tables, stone jars and stone totems.

“I think with the earthy and natural materials we have created a foundation. Whether you are in the bar or the restaurant, you will not getting the feeling of being in a skyscraper. You will have a fantastic view but the concrete and steel is not so dominant [in the design],” Silverstrin explained.

Discussing the client’s brief for the design, Silverstrin explained that he was asked to create a space that is not only unique, but also exceptional.

“I tried to satisfy his request by creating a concept where the customer surprisingly enters the dining area through the kitchen, thus enriching both its sight and sense of smell before being seated,” he described.

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